Home handyman killed in holiday accident

Trent Page died despite efforts to revive him after he was rescued from a crawlspace under his Avondale home. Photo / NZPAAuthorities are urging home handymen to call in experts, rather than attempting DIY work, after the death yesterday of a 42-year-old Aucklander who was working with wires under his house.

Trent Page, a carpenter by trade, was investigating a problem under his Chalmers St home in Avondale when he was electrocuted about 10.15am.

His partner, Megan Thompson, heard a noise from under the house and found him not breathing.

Paramedics tried CPR for about 20 minutes after freeing Mr Page from a crawlspace, but could not revive him.

Police and the Electrical Safety Organisation warned people not to try do-it-yourself repairs in areas with which they were not familiar.

"Whatever he was doing was wrong and he sadly paid the ultimate price," said the organisation's president, Michael Chopping.

Accident Compensation Corporation figures show the home is the most dangerous place for New Zealanders.

DIY disasters killed nearly 600 people in the year to last June - an average of more than 11 a week - and 658,000 people suffered household injuries.

Authorities are urging home handymen to call in experts, rather than attempting DIY work, after the death yesterday of a 42-year-old Aucklander who was working with wires under his house.

Trent Page, a carpenter by trade, was investigating a problem under his Chalmers St home in Avondale when he was electrocuted about 10.15am.

His partner, Megan Thompson, heard a noise from under the house and found him not breathing.

Paramedics tried CPR for about 20 minutes after freeing Mr Page from a crawlspace, but could not revive him.

Police and the Electrical Safety Organisation warned people not to try do-it-yourself repairs in areas with which they were not familiar.

"Whatever he was doing was wrong and he sadly paid the ultimate price," said the organisation's president, Michael Chopping.

Accident Compensation Corporation figures show the home is the most dangerous place for New Zealanders.

DIY disasters killed nearly 600 people in the year to last June - an average of more than 11 a week - and 658,000 people suffered household injuries.

Authorities are urging home handymen to call in experts, rather than attempting DIY work, after the death yesterday of a 42-year-old Aucklander who was working with wires under his house.

Trent Page, a carpenter by trade, was investigating a problem under his Chalmers St home in Avondale when he was electrocuted about 10.15am.

His partner, Megan Thompson, heard a noise from under the house and found him not breathing.

Paramedics tried CPR for about 20 minutes after freeing Mr Page from a crawlspace, but could not revive him.

Police and the Electrical Safety Organisation warned people not to try do-it-yourself repairs in areas with which they were not familiar.

"Whatever he was doing was wrong and he sadly paid the ultimate price," said the organisation's president, Michael Chopping.

Accident Compensation Corporation figures show the home is the most dangerous place for New Zealanders.

DIY disasters killed nearly 600 people in the year to last June - an average of more than 11 a week - and 658,000 people suffered household injuries.

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